By the members, for the members

A Board of Trustees, elected by the members, governs LCEC. As members themselves, they work to ensure quality service and reliable electricity at competitive rates for the members. Board members serve the membership as a whole and represent all geographic areas. They make decisions and set policies in the best interest of all members. At the same time, Trustees must …

Op-Ed from Dennie Hamilton, LCEC, Executive Vice President & Chief Executive Officer

LCEC is a not-for-profit electric distribution cooperative serving 214,000 customers throughout Southwest Florida since 1940. For more than 75 years, Lee County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) has enjoyed strong relationships with its members, business leaders, and local governments. We have negotiated numerous franchise agreements during that time following brief, cordial, and inexpensive discussions. Negotiation of a new agreement in Cape Coral …

Why not put all the lines underground?

According to Ted Kury, director of energy studies at the University of Florida’s Public Utility Research Center, burying lines is not a magic bullet for hurricane preparedness. Floodwaters could slow down restoration of underground infrastructure. Although tree branches do not affect buried lines, tree roots do. Uprooted trees throughout the LCEC service territory ripped lines out of the ground during …

Environmental awards help strike a delicate balance

LCEC recently awarded Environmental Funding Awards to five local organizations whose mission centers around protecting the environment and the wildlife that inhabit it through education and action. These funding awards are just one of the many ways that LCEC positively impacts and supports wildlife and the environment. These award winners include the Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife, the regional Monofilament …

Power restoration after Hurricane Irma – our only job was to get the lights back on!

Nearly two-thirds of all electric customers in Florida were without power by the time Hurricane Irma left the state. After a disastrous weather event, utility companies such as LCEC are faced not only with restoration, but also with rebuilding portions of the electric grid that have been destroyed. Many LCEC customers never lost power and the thousands that did were …

Negotiations with the City Reach Impasse Again

Despite numerous concessions to the City, it appears negotiations on a new electric service franchise agreement are at a standstill once again. Having reached an impasse, LCEC presented a final franchise agreement proposal for review by the City Council, outlining the numerous concessions made to accommodate City positions. This includes reinstating a purchase option not found in any other LCEC …

LCEC Prepares for Hurricane Irma

LCEC’s preparation begins long before a hurricane threatens to make landfall in Southwest Florida. To ensure LCEC has the resources needed for restoration, the organization cultivates relationships with power line and tree-trimming contractors, fuel companies, material vendors, food service vendors, other cooperatives and local agencies for back-up resources. In addition, LCEC’s more than 375 employees play a critical role in …

Our Roots Run Deep

LCEC brought power to parts of Southwest Florida when no other utility would. Back in 1940, other power companies weren’t interested in going outside of the city limits. There was no profit to be made from rural areas. Cooperatives, like LCEC, were established by the people who shared the principles of helping their neighbor and delivering affordable power to those without. …